benefit from 20 years of experience in writing, publishing, and digital media

Memoir Class

Begin Writing Your Memoir: 5-Week Online Course with Nell Boeschenstein

Starting April 17, this five-week course with Professor Nell Boeschenstein is designed to introduce students to this generous genre and to start them down the path of putting their own stories to paper. Students will explore everything from how to select a subject and structure to the pivotal role of narrative voice, the impact of pacing, and the benefits of research.

How to Blog Meaningfully

How to Blog Meaningfully & Grow Your Audience: May 18

Many writers hear that they should start blogging to build their platform, help them get published, or sell more books. But is blogging right for you and your career? If so, what should you blog about? And perhaps most importantly, how can you do it effectively and without wasting important time you could spend on paying work?

This live webinar covers the best practices of worthwhile blogging and how it can make a difference to the growth of your author career. You'll learn the secrets of shareable & spreadable content, the best ways to get new readers, and how to attract more opportunities (and improve your writing skills!) by posting great content. It's also critical to understand how online writing is different from print-based writing, so you'll get a crash course in how to write blog posts that are online-reader and SEO-friendly (optimized for search engines), to increase your blog's discoverability and traffic over time.

How to Publish Your Book

The Great Courses: How to Publish Your Book

In the 24 eye-opening lectures of How to Publish Your Book, Jane Friedman provides you with sought-after secrets of the publishing process that will help you navigate this difficult progression, bypass pitfalls that many novice authors get hung up on, and improve your chances of being considered for publication. She acts as your personal guide though the entire process from finalizing your manuscript, to writing the perfect pitch, to reviewing contracts and marketing your book. She provides the candid scoop on what you need to do in order to increase your chances of being considered. The knowledge you’ll gain by having an inside expert teaching you how to position your book for publication gives you a unique advantage and drastically increases your chances of getting noticed in this increasingly competitive industry.

Self-Study: Become a Ghost-writer

Taught by author Roz Morris: It's easy to find writing advice. But it's not easy to get good guidance about how to ghost-write, what's expected of a ghost-writer and how to avoid the inevitable hazards. This course will teach you how the world of ghost-writing works, how writers get started, how to get commissions, how to pitch to a client, and how to take the project successfully to completion.

Nonfiction book proposals

Self-Study: How to Write a Powerful Book Proposal That Sells

In brief: This is a comprehensive self-study course on producing nonfiction book proposals in the digital age. The focus is not just on writing a book proposal that will sell the idea, but that will also sell the book when it finally makes its way to market.

The Long Version
A book proposal is a business plan for your nonfiction book, and whether you plan to traditionally publish or self-publish, a good proposal has a dramatic and immediate impact on the potential success of your work.

That’s because a thorough proposal evaluates the audience for the work, how it will stack up against the competition, and why the book will succeed in the marketplace. A solid plan requires research and a thorough understanding of your readership. By developing a full proposal, you’ll gain a clear and compelling view of what has a good chance of selling—an important step whether you want to find an agent, pitch a publisher, or self-publish.

If you plan to write the book first, and figure out the proposal later, reconsider your process. Most nonfiction books are signed on the basis of a proposal and a sample chapter or two. The publisher is often very involved in the development of the content. Writing the entire book before selling it might not only be a time-consuming test run, but you won’t have the insight and knowledge of how to produce a better book until you write the proposal. Many authors, after finishing the proposal, end up changing their angle, perspective, or narrative focus after better understanding what will sell in book form.