WRITING ON THE ETHER: Transmedia!

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Table of Contents

  1. StoryWorld in Play: Transmedia!
  2. Conferences: ConfabWorld at Full Speed
  3. NaNoWriMo: RescueTime to the Rescue
  4. Platforms: Shatzkin on New Gatekeepers
  5. eBook Adoption: UK Slowdown?
  6. Craft: A Darker Side
  7. Books: Reading on the Ether
  8. Last Gas: Stumbling Into England / B&N vs. Amazon


StoryWorld in Play: Transmedia!

“Relevant, credible, and genuine…you’re going to find rabbit holes you want to jump into.”

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Alison Norrington

Within minutes of opening the StoryWorld Conference + Expo in Hollywood, its  chair person and tireless advocate, Alison Norrington, cinched the special dynamic that makes this event both professionally demanding and personally engaging.

Norrington’s call for work that is “relevant, credible, and genuine” is important in a discipline that’s a big tent at best and, at worst, all too easily aligned with faeries at the bottom of someone’s garden.

agent, author, books, digital, ebooks, Jane Friedman, Porter Anderson, publisher, publishing, Writing on the Ether, Dan Blank, We Grow Media, Build Your Author Platform By day’s end, even she was joking from the podium, “We’re not supposed to say the word ‘transmedia,’ are we?”

Norrington’s UK-based consultancy, StoryCentralDIGITAL, is a going concern, and it is very much focused on “transmedia strategies, participative experiences, production, architecture and planning, and utilizing social media”

But the catch-all phrase we all tossed around last year (50 Ethers ago) at the San Francisco debut of this F+W Media conference probably lends itself more readily to the #transmediapickuplines with which conferees tweet-ertain each other than to the term of art we all need.

 

Let me give you a partial definition of “transmedia.” This much can get you through our Etherizing of the topic here, with the proviso that nobody’s explication of the concept is complete. Key elements of “transmedial” work usually — not always, but usually — stress:

  • Storytelling that purposely jumps from its natural, expected vehicle or format to merge with, or embrace, other disciplines;
  • Audience/”player” participation or interaction, sometimes with the potential to substantially impact the storyline or project outcome; and
  • A frequent game component — “play” has arrived quickly this year as a readily invoked value in conference sessions.

Apparently, one happy advantage of the conference’s move this year to Los Angeles is a heavy first-day involvement by Disney’s Imagineering unit. Mercifully free of mouse ears, the Imagineers commandeered the opening of the three-day confab with that peculiar sweetness that Walt’s success always ensures, at once homey and astute.

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Scott Trowbridge

Scott Trowbridge, vice president of the Imagineers’ R&D, led us off with a keynote in which he explained that the Disney Imagineering (there’s a very knees-up video there for you) comprises some 1,500 people working in 140 disciplines, from sculpture and painting to writing and science.

With thanks to conference attendee and Ball State instructor Brad King (who produced quick recaps of a couple of sessions), we can give you a list of Trowbridge’s five missions for Imagineering:

  1. Tell great storiesagent, author, books, digital, ebooks, Jane Friedman, Porter Anderson, publisher, publishing, Writing on the Ether, Dan Blank, We Grow Media, Build Your Author Platform
  2. Bring great characters to life;
  3. Make great places (not only theme parks but also online);
  4. Find new ways of engaging; and
  5. Understand changing audiences.

So pervasive are Disney terrestrial sites now, Trowbridge said, that the sun never sets on the empire, “nor on the meetings and conference  calls.”

Before he turned things over to LOST producer Damon Lindelof, who was interviewed in an onstage conversation with Disney Studios president Sean Bailey, Trowbridge rolled videos (based on various “playtests” the Imagineers have worked on, and the development of a “story engine” approach in which narrative elements are generated in computer-driven models.

agent, author, books, digital, ebooks, Jane Friedman, Porter Anderson, publisher, publishing, Writing on the Ether, Dan Blank, We Grow Media, Build Your Author PlatformHe then used the StoryWorld setting to announce Disney’s new Living Worlds, an open grant initiative with which the outfit hopes to attract proposals specifically for transmedial development.

The most valuable sessions that followed later in the day were panel discussions on authorship in transmedial events (in which audience interaction can really run away with the ball), and the often unpleasant divide between game people and story people (who may not believe their respective realms have much to do with each other).

If the conference has shoved off into the humidity of this warm October week under the Hollywood sign with that friendliness that Disney efforts always manifest, we could surely do worse. While last year’s confab seemed to descend directly into tales of mass-contagion scenarios (do we really need another transmedial event about a doomsday virus?), this year’s gathering has the Imagineers to thank for its collegial comfort, not a bad thing.

 

And the conference this year is very much like last year’s in one respect: community. The transmedia crowd at times resembles a committed Dr. Who fan club responding to a PBS fund-raising drive.

agent, author, books, digital, ebooks, Jane Friedman, Porter Anderson, publisher, publishing, Writing on the Ether, Dan Blank, We Grow Media, Build Your Author Platform There’s a sort of fervor that binds them, despite — and maybe because of — the very diversity of their efforts. Scavenger hunts may come and go in almost any transmedial event, it seems, but these attendees will stand by their colleagues’ projects with a lot more fellow feeling that you pick up at, say, a standard publishing or writers’ conference.

One caveat, so common at these events that it’s becoming nearly ridiculous to see it repeat: inadequate wi-fi.

If you’re going to bring together people whose business runs online — and particularly if you want them to communicate the riches of the festivities to the rest of the world for you — you simply have to provide robust wi-fi support to your conference. It’s truly time that this be gotten right. But here at the Loews, well, no. Even after having Norrington tell us that wi-fi capacity had been increased on Wednesday, StoryWorld conference organizers were not, in fact, providing a strong enough signal.

It’s not too late to change that now.

And it’s not just Disney going on in that ballroom with the weak signal. The StoryWorlders are genuinely supportive of each other. However widely you want to cast that “transmedial” net, when these folks gather under Norrington’s blonde aegis, it’s a small, small world, after all.

It’s nice to be back in it for a few days.

 

Follow hashtag #SWC12 for live tweets from the StoryWorld conference floor through Friday.

agent, author, books, digital, ebooks, Jane Friedman, Porter Anderson, publisher, publishing, Writing on the Ether, Dan Blank, We Grow Media, Build Your Author Platform For those in Los Angeles for the conference, an interesting new sponsor presentation is on tap today at noon from The Shadow Gang with its new Galahad multi-platform distribution engine designed to manage channels for workers in publishing, film, television, gaming and branding.

Calvin Reid has a writeup on it at Publishers Weekly, Shadow Gang Debuts Galahad Transmedia Content Distribution Platform, writing:

Galahad will launch first with an “immersive video builder,” a content platform that allows producers to generate interactive video narratives, sequencing film content in a way that viewers can affect the outcome.

More to come from the conference session.

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Conferences: ConfabWorld at Full Speed

Some of us won’t be leaving Hollywood when the StoryWorld train pulls out of the station Friday.

Two first-ever F+W conferences follow StoryWorld in the aging but ambitious setting of the Loews Hollywood, both running Friday to Sunday.

agent, author, books, digital, ebooks, Jane Friedman, Porter Anderson, publisher, publishing, Writing on the Ether, Dara M. Beevas, Beaver's Pond Press, The Indie Author RevolutionScreenwriter’s World is just that, with its own double Pitch Slam, and a three-track array of sessions on feature screenplays, the business of screenwriting, and “the small screen and beyond.”

That one is hashtagged #Screen12 and its heaviest Twitter traffic should start moving around 8aPT/11aET on Friday.

agent, author, books, digital, ebooks, Jane Friedman, Porter Anderson, publisher, publishing, Writing on the Ether, Dara M. Beevas, Beaver's Pond Press, The Indie Author RevolutionAnd running parallel to the screenwriters is Writer’s Digest Conference West, a first doing of the big deal on the Left Coast .(The annual New York conference is still very much alive and in the planning stages for the spring.)

This one also has three tracks of breakout sessions at times — though they’re not tracked by theme, you simply choose what you need and want to see most. It also has a double Pitch Slam and a huge roster of good people in place with sessions from craft to legal topics and marketing and a NaNoWriMo prep, an author signing showcase and enough more to raise a blizzard of tweets.

I’ll be moderating a panel, Hardcore Author Marketing, at 3:30pPT / 6:30pET Saturday, and with any luck we should have the tweet-storm revving into high dudgeon for that one. I’m lucky to have panelists Nina Amir, Rob Eagar, Robert Lee Brewer, and David Rozansky onboard, and each is coming in with a specialized perspective on where authors’ attention to marketing issues should be focused today. Hope you’ll join us.

That hashtag is #WDCW12 and some noise may be moving on your tweet machine as early as 12:30pPT/3:30pET Friday, from a boot camp session with Rob Eagar of Wildfire Marketing.

For an updated list of more planned confabs, please see the Publishing Conferences page at PorterAnderson.com.

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NaNoWriMo: RescueTime to the Rescue

I want to alert you to an offer I’ve been told about by the good guys at RescueTime.

agent, author, books, digital, ebooks, Jane Friedman, Porter Anderson, publisher, publishing, Writing on the Ether, Dan Blank, We Grow Media, Build Your Author PlatformThat’s the online time-management service I’ve used for years and have tweeted about frequently. RescueTime tracks your use of apps and sites to show you exactly how you’re using your time on the keyboard. And its FocusTime functionality, my favorite, will shut down your access to exactly what you choose for exactly how long you choose.

It’s like closing the door to your writing studio for as long as you need to think.

RescueTime is going to give writers a chance to use its services free during the NaNoWriMo month of November, with no obligation to stay on after that or to go forward and buy the premium service (with FocusTime). I should note here that I’m a referral partner with RescueTime because I like the program so much. This means that if you enter the site on my referral link and eventually choose to subscribe to the premium service, I get a small commission.

agent, author, books, digital, ebooks, Jane Friedman, Porter Anderson, publisher, publishing, Writing on the Ether, Dan Blank, We Grow Media, Build Your Author PlatformBUT, again, the November arrangement is without obligation or cost. And during NaNoWriMo, RescueTime will be doing a no-names scan of how writers’ time is divvied up to study such questions as:

  • What writing tools are used most by successful writers?
  • Do people tend to write more during the morning? Or in the afternoon?
  • Does setting a dedicated schedule help the process?
  • What types of situations help people push through to the end of the project?

If you’re interested, give it a spin.

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Platforms: Shatzkin on New Gatekeepers

It’s not just about the content itself; it’s also about the ancillary value the platform can add; it’s about the format/wrapper/technology that supports the objectives of the audience for that content.

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Mike Shatzkin

In Platforms” are not exclusively the purview of Kindle, NOOK, and other retailers, Mike Shatzkin takes an interesting look at how, as he sees it, “the most important single concept publishers need to take on board to succeed in the digital future is ‘vertical.'”

If you feel you’re late to this party, you’re not alone. Shatzkin, himself, writes of having not fully grasped — like a lot of us, I’m sure — the new influence these things are starting to exert on how we do business and might do it going forward.

This provides a lot for publishers to be thinking about. Intuitively, one assumes the job of the publisher is to make the investments necessary to get their content onto all the platforms where it might sell, particularly if the customers there wouldn’t find or acquire it any other way.

It’s where Shatzkin takes the issue next that will cause you to sit up: Who controls the platforms controls the access. And that very well may not be a publisher.

It also means that the platform owner would control the audience and could, conceivably, not allow all competing content access. Or they could, over time as they gain a stronger hold on a larger audience, reduce the payments to outside content owners.

agent, author, books, digital, ebooks, Jane Friedman, Porter Anderson, publisher, publishing, Writing on the Ether, Dan Blank, We Grow Media, Build Your Author Platform In fact, Shatzkin is willing to deploy an old and rarely loved word for what a strong platform becomes in our digital dynamic: a gatekeeper.

Both platforms and subscription services constitute a land grab, or, more precisely, a customer-control grab. Is it wise for publishers to allow their content to be used to strengthen the grip a gatekeeper has on an audience, whether or not they start out as a competitor? Whether or not it is wise, do publishers have any choice?

And there’s the $64,000 question, isn’t it? Do publishers have a choice? We’ve been yelling so loudly about an age of no gatekeepers that maybe we, like Shatzkin, have been slow to realize there are plenty of them around — they’re just not the publishers.

 

Far be it from me to get into “be afraid, be very afraid.” But this is interesting and, yes, potentially disturbing stuff — and without any effort by Shatzkin to make it more than anything but abundantly clear that the verticals are rising all around us.

Now sensitized to the power of the platform, I’m seeing more of it everywhere. B&N and Kobo have created tools for consumers to save treasured content and to enhance discovery.

Nevertheless, Shatzkin writes of how publishers can use platforming as well, and brings in Sourcebooks as one example. It’s an interesting read at a good length.

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eBook Adoption: UK Slowdown?

Print sales are generally public. Bestseller lists — with hard, open numbers to back them up — are a fixture. Not so for e-books, for which total sales and breakdowns by retailer or category are still carefully guarded by retailers and publishers alike. It’s a shame, as greater transparency would allow for better decision making and give us an overall sense of the contours of digital change.

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Michael Bhaskar

Working recently on a feature about ebooks and self-publishing for a winter edition of Writer’s Digest, I couldn’t agree more with the talented and always observant Michael Bhaskar, one of our European colleagues, in his Publishing Perspectives piece, Has UK E-Book Adoption Reached a Plateau?

As he puts it, however, the highly guarded numbers around ebooks can’t mask what seems to be the slowing (but still upward) trend — a natural and predictable development, mind you — now in sales in the United Kingdom, a pattern that easily replicates the inflection point reached in U.S. sales this year.

Firstly though, we should separate the two strands of digital publishing that have emerged. On the one hand you have straightforward “vanilla” e-books, or digital replicas of print titles; on the other you have digital-first, digital-only e-books that require more developmental work, breaking new ground in terms of product and business model. These latter projects have, I believe, caught on in the UK more than elsewhere.

agent, author, books, digital, ebooks, Jane Friedman, Porter Anderson, publisher, publishing, Writing on the Ether, Dan Blank, We Grow Media, Build Your Author Platform As far as who’s doing the selling in the realm, by the way, that, too, looks like something we’d see in the Heartland:

Amazon Kindle is still the dominant platform, shifting more devices and selling more books than any other retailer by a considerable margin… Apple iBooks, Kobo, Google and Sony, alongside a host of smaller start-ups, are all in the mix though.

And some numbers:

Recent Publishers Association figures put e-book sales growth at 188% over the past year — which actually represents a slowdown. Digital trade sales accounted for £84 million in revenue from January to June 2012…As ever, no one knows quite for sure what will happen, but the picture will emerge in the weeks after Christmas.

Bhaksar’s discussion of the trend is succinct. And realizing that our friends across the Atlantic have been very smartly using our pratfalls in the industry! the industry! to sort out better pathways for themselves, it’s interesting now to see what we can discern about U.S. realities in the rear-view mirror. This is a clean, quick read worth your attention, representative of the many things Publishing Perspectives does well for our increasingly global business.

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Craft: A Darker Side

How does a writer cope with the often inevitable, painful jagged edges of our broken dreams and failed hopes?

agent, author, books, digital, ebooks, Jane Friedman, Porter Anderson, publisher, publishing, Writing on the Ether, Dan Blank, We Grow Media, Build Your Author Platform In The Seven Stages of Publishing Grief (or Hello Darkness, My Old Friend) at Writer Unboxed, regular contributor Robin LaFevers takes on a part of the business we don’t deal with in brightly lit conference settings. Maybe that’s a mistake.

This festering disappointment we sometimes feel is the elephant in the room among writers. We’re not allowed to talk of it lest we come off as ungrateful. We also can’t talk about it because so much of publishing ‘success’ is smoke and mirrors—it’s about creating the illusion of being in demand in the hopes it will make us actually in demand. So if we talk too openly about how our career is really going, well, we’ve just let the cat out of the bag, and everyone will know our true numbers and our career will sink even faster.

LaFevers adapts the familiar “seven stages,” from “shock and denial” to “reconstruction” and “resurrection.” And she brings a generous personal tone to the post, something with which many writers will identify:

I’ve gone through this entire process at least three times, and I have no doubt I will journey through it another time or two before I’m done.

As usual at Writer Unboxed, an interesting comment section follows the piece.

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Books: Reading on the Ether

The books you see here have been referenced recently in Writing on the Ether.

I’m bringing them together in one spot each week, to help you recall and locate them, not as an endorsement. And, needless to say, we lead our list weekly with our fine Writing on the Ether Sponsors, in gratitude for their support.

 


 

Writing on the Ether Sponsors:


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Last Gas: Stumbling Into England / B&N vs. Amazon

There are many good reasons for hoping Barnes & Noble has a successful launch of its Nook devices and UK shop, but the news last week that this roll-out has been delayed by two weeks does not augur well.

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Philip Jones

In business, it’s called “execution.”

And what Philip Jones of The Bookseller outlines in A Nook start at TheFutureBook is a non-start.

Hardly good execution.

agent, author, books, digital, ebooks, Jane Friedman, Porter Anderson, publisher, publishing, Writing on the Ether, Dan Blank, We Grow Media, Build Your Author Platform Jones did a round robin of various retailers to see what explanations and pre-order arrangements were offered for Nook customers.

According to Sainbury’s, which has taken the Kobo devices off its shelves in order to stock the Nook, they are “out of stock”; as they are at ‘premier retail partner’ John Lewis; and at Argos, and Curry’s. None of these sites offered me the chance to pre-order one. At Waitrose its search engine simply replaces Nook with ‘cook.’

Guess who was ready to step, once more unto the breach, left open by a potential rival?

The other big announcement last week, of course, was Amazon’s Paperwhite, now coming to the UK from 25th October.

agent, author, books, digital, ebooks, Jane Friedman, Porter Anderson, publisher, publishing, Writing on the Ether, Dan Blank, We Grow Media, Build Your Author Platform Even while seeing some delays of its own on getting Paperwhite delivery to go as planned, Amazon’s execution is sharper. No silence, no changes of “Paperwhite” to “Lilywhite.” Jones:

On (Amazon’s UK) website it tells me that “due to popular demand, orders placed today are expected to ship in the week of November 12th.” The device will, however, be available in Waterstones’ stores from the end of the month.

agent, author, books, digital, ebooks, Jane Friedman, Porter Anderson, publisher, publishing, Writing on the Ether, Dan Blank, We Grow Media, Build Your Author Platform

Jeff Bezos

Jeff Bezos has worked with his teams to help pave the British tarmac, giving interviews, for example. Here’s one he did with the BBCKindle Fire HD and Paperwhite sales make Amazon no profit, as usual, without byline, which is one of the BBC’s own misguided failures of execution. Credit writers, please.

And then there’s one with the Telegraph’s Matt Warman. Barnes and Noble, in fact, has no personality like Bezos, no star to shine in appearances, no big name to throw into the fray.

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Matt Warman

And Bezos knows what to do, of course. He takes the chance, in the Telegraph’s Amazon: don’t blame us for the revolution on the high street, to try to jump ahead in the UK of the feckless carping you still hear from many of our US publishing cohorts who simply can’t live without positioning Amazon as their Great Satan.

Bezos says to Warman, and to the UK:

“Firstly, high street shops will evolve so they won’t freeze in time – they’ll change, they’ll evolve, they’ll figure out a new path. The competition will make everybody better. And our job is to provide the best service we can – efficient, low prices, the best selection. The customers decide where they want to shop. But if somebody buys a Kindle they continue to buy physical books.”

Even that is good execution. You put your celebrity founding CEO at center stage, and you have him short-circuit the losers’ whines with truthful but reassuring commentary.

agent, author, books, digital, ebooks, Jane Friedman, Porter Anderson, publisher, publishing, Writing on the Ether, Dan Blank, We Grow Media, Build Your Author Platform And the also-ran, Barnes and Noble, is tripping over its own trousers, now down around its shipping-delay ankles — and no word from the company, even to support its retailers. Looks cowardly, doesn’t it?

When one tries to make the “big splash” Jones reminds that B&N promised the UK, only to find that it can’t get its little plastic machines onto the shelves and can’t manage to field anyone with a rationale for the failure? — there’s one logical conclusion. Here’s Jones with it:

Amazon is still the pace setter and is capable of moving faster and more aggressively than anyone else.

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Eoin Purcell

He’s quoting industry veteran Eoin Purcell, who clarifies that Amazon has, once again, stepped up to prove how it executes its leadership in the field. In Amazon Steals Everyone’s Thunder Again (But Quietly), Purcell writes:

Fascinatingly clever (if predictable in many ways) move from Amazon to extend the reach of its Kindle Owners’ Lending Library (KOLL) to the UK, Germany and France. By doing so it demonstrates very clearly that it is Amazon who is really driving the pace of development in ebook adoption and ebook retail.

 

In Purcell’s write, in fact, the Amazonian attention to authors comes to the fore.

I’ve talked before about how important authors are to the success of an epublishing platform and ecosystem. Sometimes I think the retailers agree with me on this, other times I think they only pay lip service to the idea. Perhaps that’s a lingering snobbery regarding self-publishing authors (which is foolish, idiotic and wrong-headed in an age when some of the biggest writers are rapidly moving toward self publishing, are already self publishing or have emerged from the self publishing space). …The longer these ecosystems remain closed shops to direct author engagement the larger a lead they allow Amazon to build up on them.

agent, author, books, digital, ebooks, Jane Friedman, Porter Anderson, publisher, publishing, Writing on the Ether, Dan Blank, We Grow Media, Build Your Author Platform That was a big quote, and an important one. In case your eyes glazed over, I want to repeat for you Purcell’s last line:

The longer these ecosystems remain closed shops to direct author engagement the larger a lead they allow Amazon to build up on them.

Purcell makes it even plainer:

Every author Amazon signs up for KOLL is three months of exclusive sales for Amazon, three months lost revenue for their rivals. More importantly it is three months of sales data and analysis for Amazon that no-one else will have.

The point to get here is that in the Battle for Britain, the winning execution isn’t limited to who can ship the bright-shinies on time. It’s also deeply rooted in who can bond best with the essential element, the authors of the work to come.

 

In the States, the only thing more tiresome than wrangling over the political elections (how can it not be November yet?) is endless Amazon-bashing from various parties in publishing who have lost their proverbial shirts to Seattle.

If they can muzzle themselves long enough to watch how this all goes down in the UK and elsewhere in Europe, they may at least be able, at last, to look back and understand better how they were beaten at their own games in the Newer World.

Purcell can say he sounded the alarm:

Nook’s (self-publishing) platform is US only, though the talk is that this will change soon, the longer B&N & Microsoft exclude non-US citizens from the service, the longer Amazon has to lock in exclusive content for three months at a time.

Purcell’s bottom line;

What will happen when one of those (self-publishing author) sign ups turns out to be the next E.L. James? What will happen is that Amazon will sign that author up directly, before the KOLL period ends and the game, for that author, is up for the other platforms.

|  |  |

https://twitter.com/floerianthebard/status/258688331527884800

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Why You Need an Author Platform by Dan BlankWhy You Need an Author Platform: Free Webinar on Oct. 24 by Dan Blank

Are you a writer trying to build an audience for your books? What you need is an author platform—a strategic way to find the exact right audience for your writing and build a strong relationship with them. In this FREE 1-hour webinar, Dan Blank explains the value of building an author platform, the biggest challenges to creating one, and some of the essential steps in the process. Date: Wednesday, Oct. 24, 2p ET. If you work with writers, please pass this along to them as well!

Click here to sign up for the free Oct. 24 webinar!


Main image / Eric Huang, Instagram; LaFevers column image Flickr/Just.Luc; Dan Blank webinar promo images Creative Commons/Flickr: Blerina, Jeppy Mortellaro, Ed Yourdon, Paul Bence, NYCArthur, Brendan Murphy

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Jane's newest online course focuses on how to take a holistic and strategic approach to social media that’s based on long-term reader growth and sound principles of online marketing. You won’t find gimmicks or short-term approaches here. Rather, my philosophy is that (1) your work—your writing—is always central, and (2) you have to enjoy what you’re doing on social media for it to be sustainable and eventually become a meaningful part of your author platform.

A big challenge for authors is deciding what types of marketing will work for them strategically, and figuring out what will be effective in cutting through the noise without consuming huge amounts of time. Over the course of 12 weeks, our goal will be to answer this question for you, eliminate as much guesswork as possible, and retain your authentic voice regardless of your strategy.

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Porter Anderson (Find him on Twitter / Find him at Google+) is a Fellow with the National Critics Institute. As a journalist, he has worked with three networks of CNN, The Village Voice, Dallas Times Herald, D Magazine, and other outlets. He contributes to Digital Book World’s Expert Publishing Blog and to Writer Unboxed, and has been posted by the United Nations to Rome (P-5, laissez-passer) for the World Food Programme. He is based in Tampa. His companion to this column, Issues on the Ether Issues on the Ether, appears on Tuesdays at PublishingPerspectives.com, and is followed by a live chat on Twitter each Wednesday, hashtagged #EtherIssue. His Porter Anderson Meets series of interviews for London's The Bookseller features a live Twitter interview each Monday hashtagged #PorterMeets, followed by a write-up in the magazine on the stands each Friday. More at PorterAndersonMedia.com.

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10 Comments

  1. Porter, I’ll be at WDCW, and attending your panel, just to see how hardcore you get. Looking forward to hearing you opine, seeing you shine and watching you lay it on the line. (After I figure out what “it” is.)

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